Serving the Needs of the Ultra-High-Net-Worth Client

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As Managing Director/Investments of The CR Wealth Management Group at Stifel, Chuck Roberts participates in the structuring of individualized client wealth management plans. Primarily focused on serving ultra-high net worth (UHNW) families, Chuck Roberts understands the unique needs of this select group of investors.

The UHNW investor comes to a financial professional not only with household assets in the 99 percentile, but also with a high level of education and experience. According to a study by Spectrem Group, approximately 94% percent of UHNW investors have college degrees, while 45% have an advanced degree and 21% have an MBA. This may be a driving force behind the tendency of UHNW investors to value quality information as the most trustworthy sign of competency in a financial professional like Chuck Roberts.

Article provided by Chuck Roberts, Managing Director/Investments with Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated, Member SIPC & NYSE, who can be contacted in the New York, New York office at (212) 328-1000.

1095 Avenue of the Americas
3rd and 4th Floor
New York, NY 10036

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Chuck Roberts Uses Private Equity Funds

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Private Equity Funds
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Chuck Roberts of The CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel serves as Managing Director/Investments at Stifel’s New York City branch, where he primarily serves ultra-high net worth clients who come to the firm via referral. Chuck Roberts serves this select group of investors by channeling their assets into a set of products, which may include private equity.

When one of Chuck’s clients decides to select private equity as an investment product, he will channel their funds into a specific company. A private equity fund contains the assets of a number of investors, whose capital goes toward purchasing a percentage of a company.

If a private equity fund does not contain sufficient funds to purchase a company, it may borrow the remaining amount. This allows for a greater investment that – if the purchased company does well – may yield higher investment returns. With that said, borrowing the remaining amount would also entail higher potential risk.

Private equity funds most often invest in historically established companies. Often, the investment precedes active efforts by the fund to encourage growth, so as to guide the purchased company toward a profitable sale. For these efforts, funds generally receive a management fee in addition to a percentage of any profits earned, though profits are never certain when one enters into a private equity investment.

Private equity funds are not appropriate for all investors. Investors should be aware that private equity funds may contain speculative investment practices that can lead to a loss of the entire investment. Private equity funds may invest in entities in which no secondary market exists and, as such, may be highly illiquid. The funds are not required to provide periodic pricing or valuation information to investors and often charge high fees that can erode performance. Additionally, they may involve complex tax structures and delays in distributing tax information.

Article provided by Chuck Roberts, Managing Director/Investments with Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated, Member SIPC & NYSE, who can be contacted in the New York, New York office at (212) 328-1000.

1095 Avenue of the Americas
3rd and 4th Floor
New York, NY 10036

The CR Wealth Management Group – How to Ask for Referrals

 

Chuck Roberts Stifel

Chuck Roberts
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Chuck Roberts serves as Managing Director/Investments for the CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel’s New York office. Serving a diverse client base that includes institutions, foundations, pension funds, and high net worth individuals, Chuck Roberts works with many clients based on referrals.

Referrals are a powerful way of growing a book of business. To get more referrals, you must be good at asking for them. Begin by making requests for referrals a habit, but do not expect that your client will automatically go out on a limb to recommend you to his or her friends and colleagues. It’s not that your clients are uncomfortable asking – it’s just that they may be busy or it simply doesn’t cross their minds. Most people are actually happy to help others, especially if it costs them nothing, so you have to ask clients for referrals.

The following are a few other tips for asking for referrals:

Make it easy for clients to refer you. Remember that your clients are busy professionals. Rather than expecting them to do all the work for you, do some of the work yourself by providing them with an e-mail template for referrals. This way, all they’ll have to do is fill in the names and press send.

Be specific about the kind of referrals you are asking for. If you want mid-sized companies, make that clear during the discussion. For example, Chuck deals with institutions and high net worth individuals, so the marketing team makes a point to be clear about the referrals they are looking for. You don’t want to spend time chasing leads that do not suit your business.

Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated | Member SIPC & NYSE

1095 Avenue of the Americas
3rd and 4th Floor
New York, NY 10036

The CR Wealth Management Group – Different Types of Investment Risk

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CR Wealth Management Group
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An economics graduate from Stony Brook University, Chuck Roberts is a Managing Director/Investments with The CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel. In his position, Chuck Roberts provides clients and institutions with wealth management strategies that strive to minimize market risks.

When it comes to investing, there are different risks Chuck Roberts is cautious about. Here is a rundown on a few of them:

Credit risk. This is the risk that a government or company will encounter financial difficulty and default on the principal or contractual interest of its debt obligations.

Foreign-exchange risk. This is the risk that the foreign country’s currency will depreciate against the dollar, eroding investment gains.

Inflation risk. This is the risk that investment gains will not keep up with rising inflation, which may result in a loss of purchasing power despite a positive portfolio performance.

Volatility risk. This is the most well-known risk, and is associated with market fluctuation. For example, stocks could go either up or down, either giving investors high return on investments or significant losses.

Article provided by Chuck Roberts, Managing Director/Investments with Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated, member SIPC and New York Stock Exchange, who can be contacted in the New York, New York office at (212) 328-1000.

How Chuck Roberts Uses Hedging

 

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Hedging
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Chuck Roberts serves as Managing Director/Investments of Stifel’s New York branch. Chuck Roberts and his colleagues at Stifel implement hedging strategies intended to guard portfolios against potential market volatility.

Hedging” refers to the process of seeking to guard investments against loss. In many cases, hedging involves the purchase of a derivative, defined as a financial contract based on a real asset.

One hedging option includes the purchasing of unrelated stocks that tend to perform opposite to the initial purchase. If, for example, an investor purchases a stock that tends to do poorly during an economic downturn, that same investor may choose to hedge that investment by purchasing a security that does well regardless of market activity. The possibility then exists for the second stock to do well and make up for the loss incurred by the initial investment.

Investors should be aware that hedge funds often engage in leverage, short-selling, arbitrage, hedging, derivatives, and other speculative investment practices that may increase investment loss. Hedge funds can be highly illiquid, are not required to provide periodic pricing or valuation information to investors, and often charge high fees that can erode performance. Additionally, they may involve complex tax structures and delays in distributing tax information. While hedge funds may appear similar to mutual funds, they are not necessarily subject to the same regulatory requirements as mutual funds.

Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated | Member SIPC & NYSE

1095 Avenue of the Americas
3rd and 4th Floor
New York, NY 10036

Services Provided by Chuck Roberts and Stifel

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With nearly 27 years of experience as a financial advisor, Chuck Roberts of the CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel develops tailored investment plans that seek to suit the unique needs of ultra high net worth clients. Chuck Roberts and his team provide many helpful services to clients, including a five-step plan that seeks to:

• Define objectives,
• Build a custom strategy,
• Help select an investment allocation,
• Evaluate progress quarterly, and
• Rebalance the portfolio as needed.

Chuck also works closely with tax and legal professionals in an effort to help clients avoid unforeseen circumstances.

Asset allocation does not ensure a profit or protect against loss. Rebalancing may have tax consequences, which clients should discuss with their tax advisor.

Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated | Member SIPC & NYSE

1095 Avenue of the Americas
3rd and 4th Floor
New York, NY 10036

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Chuck Roberts – Striving to Stand Out From the Competition

 

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CR Wealth Management Group
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As Managing Director/Investments for the CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel, Chuck Roberts offers wealth management services to ultra-high net worth individuals. With the support of Stifel’s research and resources, Chuck strives to deliver a unique professional experience with the goal of setting himself apart from other advisor’s by:

Serving affluent clients 
– Many of Chuck’s clients have unique issues regarding trusts, estate planning issues, and other financial matters. Chuck and his team are prepared to help their clients navigate these complicated circumstances in an effort to protect their wealth.

Building and implementing customized wealth management plans 
– Instead of taking a one-size-fits-all approach, Chuck and his team design personalized client portfolios tailored to accommodate the client’s individual needs.

Practicing the Four Seasons approach 
– Using the approach created by the Four Seasons Hotel, Chuck and his team believe in quality service, a focus on cooperation among employees, and a healthy respect for others.

Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated | Member SIPC & NYSE

1095 Avenue of the Americas
3rd and 4th Floor
New York, NY 10036

Chuck Roberts Stifel

Our Investment Strategy Seeks to Preserve Your Capital

Chuck Roberts Stifel

Chuck Roberts
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Together with the other members of the CR Wealth Management Group at Stifel, Chuck Roberts, Managing Director/Investments, develops appropriate investment strategies customized to his clients’ financial goals, including diversification, income, and capital preservation.

Capital preservation is an investment strategy with a single goal: Seek to protect an asset’s monetary value. In some instances, this can involve the process of protecting the asset from inflation as well. Only when the first (and sometimes the second) condition is met will the manager or owner strive to earn a return. This strategy typically involves short-term products, with risk being impacted by inflation over longer periods of time.

A capital preservation strategy recognizes that some investments are not intended to increase, and typically they’re there for a specific purpose. Retirement and saving for a down payment on a home are common situations where capital preservation is utilized.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against loss.

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The CR Wealth Management Group Approach to Investment

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Stifel
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As Managing Director/Investments with The CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel, Chuck Roberts is a seasoned financial advisor with almost three decades of experience. Operating out of Stifel’s New York offices, Chuck Roberts provides guidance to a team of 10 professionals that strive to ensure their clients receive high standards of service.

Specializing in work with clients primarily in the financial services industry, The CR Wealth Management Group takes a balanced approach to its investment strategies, focusing on diversification while meeting client requirements. Since many of the group’s clients have already attained wealth, strategies focus primarily on the preservation of existing capital.

The CR Wealth Management Group offers a broad array of products, including mutual funds, hedge funds, exchange traded funds (ETFs), and private equity. Further, the group has a client-conscious approach, holding both quarterly face-to-face meetings with clients and annual meetings that focus on holistic investment planning strategies.

Mutual funds and exchange traded funds (ETFs) are offered by prospectus only. Investors should consider a fund’s investment objective, risks, charges, and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus, which contains this and other important information, is available from your Financial Advisor and should be read carefully before investing. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate, so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. ETFs trade like a stock and may trade for less than their net asset value. There will be brokerage commissions associated with buying and selling exchange traded funds unless trading occurs in a fee-based account.

Private equity funds are not appropriate for all investors. Investors should be aware that private equity funds may contain speculative investment practices that can lead to a loss of the entire investment. Private equity funds may invest in entities in which no secondary market exists and, as such, may be highly illiquid. The funds are not required to provide periodic pricing or valuation information to investors and often charge high fees that can erode performance. Additionally, they may involve complex tax structures and delays in distributing tax information.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against loss.

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Offering Transparency and Comprehensive Services to Investment Clients

 

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CR Wealth Management Group
Image: thecrwealthmanagementgroup.com

Chuck Roberts is a member of The CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel, a St. Louis, Missouri-based investment and wealth management firm. As Managing Director/Investments, Chuck, alongside a team of financial professionals, provides a range of wealth management services, including retirement, estate, and insurance planning services for high-net-worth individuals, private business owners, foundations, nonprofits, and pensions. Stifel also provides our team with nationally-recognized equity research to further help our clients pursue their unique financial goals.

Transparency lies at the heart of Stifel’s approach, and fulfilling client requirements is always the priority. The team offers personalized service to each client, including quarterly and annual face-to-face meetings that ensure adaptability and flexibility while keeping the client well informed.

Clients are not expected to meet any minimum requirements when it comes to their portfolios, and the strategies created by the team are focused on both protecting existing assets and growing principle wealth.

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Working with Wealthy Clients

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CR Wealth Management Group
Image: thecrwealthmanagementgroup.com

A graduate of Stoney Brook University, where he studied for his BS in Business Management, Chuck Roberts serves as Managing Director/Investments of The CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel. Bringing more than two decades of experience to the role, Chuck works with his clients to create wealth management plans that take asset allocation and estate planning strategies into focus.

Chuck is a part of a 11-person team at Stifel’s New York branch that focuses on clients who already have significant wealth. This means that the strategies the team creates prioritize the preservation of existing capital and assets without compromising flexibility for future growth.

These long-term plans are designed around the firm’s services by third-party independent money managers and include stocks, bonds, and other investment products. This is reinforced by the firm’s commitment to providing stellar service, based on an adapted version of the “Four Seasons” approach, which was put in place by the hotel chain of the same name to define the service it provides to clients.

Chuck Roberts Stifel

Talk to Your Financial Advisor Before Tax-Loss Harvesting

Chuck Roberts Stifel

Chuck Roberts

Drawing on nearly three decades of experience in the investment services industry, Chuck Roberts, Managing Director/Investments with The CR Wealth Management Group of Stifel, works to help individuals of high net worth preserve and grow their wealth. Among the strategies offered by Chuck and his team is tax-loss harvesting.

Tax-loss harvesting is the act of selling a security at a loss in order to offset capital gains or taxable income. The investor then buys another asset to maintain the value and diversity of their portfolio. This may sound simple, but tax-loss harvesting is more complex than it at first appears.

Firstly, there are SEC “wash sale” rules that nullify any tax credit from capital gains losses if the seller buys a “substantially identical” asset within 30 days before or after the sale. Therefore, those wishing to benefit from tax-loss harvesting must have enough experience in the financial realm to determine the meaning of substantially identical, as some purchases before or after the sale could eliminate any benefit.

Secondly, tax-loss harvesting requires selling low and buying high. The added cost of the new position and the fees involved in the transaction may erase any gains. Furthermore, given a thorough financial plan, a given asset may be necessary to maintain a portfolio’s diversity. There is also always the possibility that the asset’s value will rebound over time. All of these factors make tax-loss harvesting a strategy best executed with the help of a qualified financial professional and tax advisor.

Stifel does not provide tax advice. You should consult with your tax advisor regarding your particular situation.
inancial professional and tax advisor.